APAMSA Feature: “What is APAMSA?” Video

Thank you to our Social Media Director, Linh Vu, for recording and putting together this video!

The aim for this video was to answer the question "What is APAMSA and what does it do?" It goes into the history and establishment of APAMSA and continues to the current day to touch on the wide reach of the organization. 

Interviews were captured at the 2016 National Conference in Chicago, Il. Images were taken from APAMSA events across the country from the past few years. 

This video may be shared and screened at APAMSA affiliated events. 

This media, in its entirety or partiality, may not be used for profit. 

APAMSA and NCAPIP Highlight National Diabetes Month

To commemorate National Diabetes Month, APAMSA would like to highlight the Screen at 23 campaign from our partners at NCAPIP

Dear Colleagues:

According to the World Health Organization, American Diabetes Association, National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control, Asian Americans are at risk of developing diabetes at a lower body mass index (BMI) than Whites, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans. The community based participatory research and academic studies done on this small but rapidly growing population have provided the literature that has caused these large institutions to change their recommends for screening diabetes in Asian Americans. The American Diabetes Association’s (ADA) latest 2015 Standards of Care in Diabetes included a body mass index of 23 kg/m2 as a risk factor to consider for testing diabetes in Asian Americans. The former cutpoint for risk being a BMI of 25, one that the researchers have been saying will leave approximately a third of a million Asian American diabetics (and even more prediabetics) undiagnosed.

A small pocket of knowledge has reached a larger stage, but there remains a gap in awareness that, unless filled, will equate to a very slow implementation of these guidelines. among providers. The Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Diabetes Coalition was formed in 2011 by a combination of these same researchers along with community and public health leaders, endocrinologists, diabetes educators, dieticians, and providers. Its objective has been to move the scientific knowledge of diabetes among Asian Americans, moving the science into guidelines for diagnosis. Now, the goal is to take this guideline and make sure it is implemented.

Screen at 23 goal:

Get every Asian American patient with a body mass index of 23 or higher screened for diabetes. This requires educating providers who previously might rule out diabetes as a risk factor for an Asian who is “skinny” or “average” in build. It requires educating the public that having a BMI of 23 is not a new definition of “overweight” or “obesity” for Asian Americans, but rather a number to look out for, one that should have individuals thinking about making healthy changes to their diet and incorporating healthy changes to their lifestyle, such as exercising. Above all, the campaign seeks to unmask diabetes and prediabetes in Asian Americans, , according to the National Institutes of Health. Go to www.Screenat23.org

Sincerely, APAMSA

For More Information, email David Hawks at dhawks@ncapip.org or call 202-441-1192. Thank you!

Click http://bit.ly/2ghh9ml to download flyer for Screen at 23 campaign.

screen-for-diabetes