2017 Region VIII Conference Recap

APAMSA’s Region VIII Conference was hosted by Oregon Health & Sciences University (OHSU) on February 25, 2017 at OHSU’s Collaborative Life Sciences Building. The conference opened with an introduction from the 2016 – 2017 region VIII co-directors, KieuYen Luu, Phuong-Vy Le, and Quang Truong followed by a brief background about national APAMSA given by Michelle Chen, APAMSA’s External Vice President. The keynote address was given by Joe Enlet, the senior policy liaison for the Multnomah County Health Department. Speaking about the healthcare disparities that are present in underrepresented ethnic communities in the state of Oregon, Joe emphasized the disparities to the Pacific Islander communities.

The first breakout session followed the keynote address and attendees attended one of the three workshops offered: Kathy Wai representing the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO) and held a workshop on how to extend healthcare to Oregonians who were previously denied access; Dr. Lynne Shinto held a workshop speaking about the access and care of alternative medicine; Lahaina Maylani Phillip gave a talk about her experiences with accessing healthcare as a Micronesian American.

During lunch, there were posters being presented by Lee Nguyen, Karen Leung, and Tuong Pham from the University of California, Davis and Jonathan Sisley from Oregon State University. There was also a tabling event from the sponsors of this year’s region VIII conference, which included APANO, Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO), OHSU’s Cell, Developmental and Cancer Biology, Radiation Medicine, OHSU Center for Inclusion and Diversity, and the United States Navy.

The second breakout session began after lunch. Joe Enlet led a workshop on relational strategies for health advocacy and policy change where he gave an introduction on the advocacy work that is being done in Oregon to benefit the APIA community. Dr. Jessica Guh gave a lecture on the Asian Minority Myth Model and how it affects the advancement of Asian Americans in the workforce. Our final workshop was a panel from Dr. Jessica Guh, Joe Enlet, and Michelle Chen. The purpose of the panel was to provide an open discussion to attendees on the outlooks of the future of healthcare policies and how it will affect the APIA community. The conference concluded with special thanks to our sponsors and speakers.

Not only did the conference provided attendees a better understanding of the needs of the APIA community, it also connect providers, community members, medical, undergraduates, and high school students from across Region VIII to one another. Students from University of Washington, UC Davis, Lewis & Clark, Portland State University, OHSU and Century High School were represented. Many ideas were exchanged on how to better represent and serve our communities. Once again Region VIII would like to thank Oregon Health Science University along with the many donors previously mentioned for their support!

Click here to see more photos!

2017 Region V Conference Recap

On February 4th, 2017, the APAMSA region V conference was held at Case Western Reserve University. The conference was sponsored by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and also featured a talk from the U.S Navy. With over forty medical students from five different schools in Ohio and Michigan, there was a lot of diversity among the audience. We had talks from different speakers on population health and screening of Asian American populations, research mentorship, communication with cultural or language differences, and more. During the conference, students were engaged in learning or discussing about health issues among the Asian American population and how to provide better care for them. At the end of the conference, dinner was served and additional food and drinks were offered at a local bar.

Why Mental Health research is important for Asians

Hey guys,

My name is David Yang and I am a second year at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. I am also your APAMSA Mental Health co-Chair! I am running an anonymous survey focused on studying the prevalence of Asian American medical students. Since we released this survey a couple weeks ago, I have gotten a lot of questions on why I am doing this. We are closing the survey Wednesday, March 8, 2016! In the hopes that you’ll understand my inspiration for running this survey, I’ve laid out my reasons below.

I first became interested in mental health during college after a friend of mine talked to me about her experience with our school’s mental health services and the pressures she got from her relatives to succeed academically. I started reading about depression and suicide rates amongst college students. In the years since, I became more involved in understanding how the unique experiences of Asians living in America have contributed to our mental health – from how academic stress contributes to depression in Asian American students to the effect of our parents’ immigration history on our mental health to the stigma that kept our communities from talking about mental health and/or neuropsychiatric conditions.

When I entered medical school, I expected to find other Asian Americans who were interested in mental health. While I have connected with so many people who feel as strongly as I do about this issue, I found the research to be lacking. There is such a large focus on the mental well-being of medical students. Why did I only find three papers that reported on depression of Asian American medical students? Since Asian Americans constitute a significant portion of the medical student population, are there programs that medical schools can implement to provide culturally competent mental health care to us?

These two big questions led me to this survey. How can we talk about our mental health without trying to understand the problem? The results of this survey will continue the conversation that was started at last year’s National APAMSA Conference on mental health in the Asian American community. It will give all of us research to better transform our schools and our future practice. And I hope it will inspire you to answer your own questions about mental health in our community!

Please click here to access the survey.

Thanks again for filling out this survey!

2017 Hepatitis Screening and Educational Grant Recipients

National APAMSA is pleased to announce the following 2017 Hepatitis Screening and Educational Grant Recipients: 
 
Hepatitis Screening Grants
Albany Medical College
David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
Drexel University College of Medicine 
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science
Sidney Kimmel Medical College (SKMC) at Jefferson University
University of South Florida- Morsani College of Medicine
UC Davis School of Medicine
UC Irvine School of Medicine
Weill Cornell Medical College
 
Educational Grant Recipients
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Texas A&M College of Medicine

We wish all the APAMSA chapters much success on their hepatitis initiatives. We look forward to learning about their work at the 2017 National APAMSA Hepatitis B & C Conference in Washington, DC!

We encourage chapters to apply for hepatitis education grants. Applications are due 4 weeks prior to the event and can be found at hepatitis.apamsa.org/grants.

The National APAMSA Hepatitis Project is generously supported by Gilead Sciences, The Chinese American Medical Society, and The Asian Health Foundation.

2017 Region VI Conference at MCW Recap

On February 4th, the 2017 Region VI conference was hosted by the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, WI.

The conference opened with a few words from APAMSA national president Ruey Hu, who invited students to explore cultural differences in health perception and what it means to be a part of APAMSA.

Presentations began with keynote speaker Dr. B Li, co-founder of National APAMSA, who shared his own personal experience with the difficulties of securing a bone marrow transplant for his own wife. Dr. Li discussed the stress, grief, and devastating consequences that were a reflection of the health disparities in the Asian-American population. Although many conference attendees were already a part of the bone marrow registry, Dr. Li’s touching story inspired many more attendees (17) to register for the National Bone Marrow Registry.

With that, Dr. Kathleen Yang-Clayton, a former deputy director of Asian-Americans Advancing Justice, spoke on advocacy through examining the needs of the community within a broader political and civil context. In highlighting the value of teamwork not only within the Asian-American community but also with other minority groups, Dr. Yang-Clayton reminded us that we all play a larger role in the fight for minority rights.

While Dr. Yang-Clayton inspired us to look beyond the Asian-American community, Dr. Xa Xiong emphasized the need to look within it. Dr. Xiong is one of six total Hmong physicians in the state of Wisconsin and explained that even within the Asian-American community, the Hmong population has been overlooked in many areas, including healthcare. In order to bridge this gap, Dr. Xiong spoke on Hmong culture and the need to be culturally competent.

After lunch, breakout sessions were held and included topics on: Herbal Medicinal Use with the Hmong (Dr. Kajua Lor), Patient Advocacy and Policy and Legislative Involvement (Dr Clarence Chou), Global Health Efforts in South Asia (Dr. D Kim), Spiritualism and Hmong Health Beliefs (Dr. Kajua Lor), Succeeding in Wards as an Asian-American (Dr. B Li), Importance of Context in Asian-American Mental Health (Dr. Seeba Anam), Strategies for Effective Medical Lecturing (Dr. Carlyle Chan) as well as presentations from the National Council of Asian Pacific Islander Physicians (Dr. Suhaila Khan, Dr. Ho Luong Tran, Dr. Dextor Louie). In addition, we welcomed a pre-medical panel hosted by MCW Dean Dawn Bragg, MCW Assistant Dean Jane Machi, Dr. Xa Xiong, and MCW medical students.

The day concluded with a panel of physicians including Dr. Carlyle Chan, Dr. Clarence Chou, Dr. Seeba Anam, Dr. Xa Xiong, and Dr. B Li who openly discussed the advancements and challenges in mental health, advocacy, health inequalities, and cultural sensitivities in the AAPI community.

We would like to thank all of our speakers, attendees, volunteers, and sponsors on making the 2017 Region VI Conference a valuable experience. We hope to continue advocating for the health of the AAPI community and cultivating more knowledgeable and motivated healthcare providers through these APAMSA events.

Find all photos here on our Facebook page! 

APAMSA Partnership: Apply For 2017 CAMS Scholarship and Fellowship

On behalf of the Chinese American Medical Society (CAMS) we would like to invite APAMSA members to apply for this year’s CAMS Scholarship Program and Summer Research Fellowship Program. The applications are now available on our website, www.camsociety.org.

Deadline to submit the applications in full is April 30, 2017, 11:59PM EST.

 

2017 CAMS Scholarship

Eligibility: To be eligible, the applicant must be in his/her first, second or third year of medical or dental school in the USA. Students just accepted into medical or dental school at the time of application are not eligible to apply.

Required Documents:

To complete the application, the following supporting documents are required:

1. Completed and Signed Application Form

2. Applicant’s Current Curriculum Vitae

3. A letter from the Dean of Student verifying that the applicant is in good standing

4. Two Letters of Recommendation

To download application or get more info, please visit www.camsociety.org/scholarship.

 

2017 CAMS Summer Research Fellowship

The purpose of this scholarship is to promote and support clinical and basic science research among Chinese American medical and dental students.

Project Criteria: Projects must be a completed in a minimum of 8 weeks and up to 10 weeks. They can either be in the basic sciences or clinical research. A physician or a dentist must sponsor and supervise the project. Special consideration will be given to projects involving Chinese American health issues. At the completion of the project, a written report should be submitted. Applicants must be a current student in an U.S. accredited medical or dental school.

Stipend: Students will be paid a stipend of $400 per week for up to 10 weeks. Research support and expenses are the responsibility of the sponsor.

Required Documents:

1. CAMS Summer Research Fellowship Application

2. Project Description Please include summary/background/hypothesis/specific aims/ methods/Analysis Plan. Maximum 5 pages.

3. Applicant’s current Curriculum Vitae. Please include education & employment

4. A Letter from the Applicant’s Supervising Investigator supporting the research project

5. A Letter from the Dean of Students verifying that the applicant is in good standing.

To download the application or get more information, please visit www.camsociety.org/fellowship.